fallaces sunt rerum species















"Since dedicating myself to getting into “superhero shape,” several articles regarding my weight have been brought to my attention. Claims have been made that I’ve been on a strict workout routine regulated by co-stars, whipped into shape by trainers I’ve never met, eating sprouted grains I can’t pronounce and ultimately losing 14 pounds off my 5’3” frame. Losing 14 pounds out of necessity in order to live a healthier life is a huge victory. I’m a petite person to begin with, so the idea of my losing this amount of weight is utter lunacy. If I were to lose 14 pounds, I’d have to part with both arms. And a foot. I’m frustrated with the irresponsibility of tabloid media who sell the public ideas about what we should look like and how we should get there."

Scarlett Johansson for the Huffington Post [x]

More of her brilliant articles can be found here.

(via theshadowsinthesun)

1 hour ago with 20657 notes — via lovinghimwasgreenandgold, © ramblingraconteur



daydreamingandnighttwerking:

thankfulforlittleinfinities:

darquingdragon:

sonicmetennant:

#no but see  #that’s the thing about telling someone your own story  #you don’t see yourself as the hero  #you see the people you love and admire as the heroes  #Rhodey and Pepper are Tony’s heroes 

oh

Oh.

1 hour ago with 333921 notes — via lovinghimwasgreenandgold, © nerdwegian



"The Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) has done things that are far more heinous than anything Grant Ward has ever done as far as we know, and yet, at the end of the movie, you’re rooting for him to come back on the side of the angels,"

Jeph Loeb (via jennieconvertible)

Well yeah because Bucky was brainwashed and waRD KNEW WHAT HE WAS DOING THE WHOLE TIME WELL YOU KNOW WHAT? DAMN YOU WARD. GODDAMN YOU.

(via itsuckstobeafangirl)

Loeb, take a little advice: SHUT YOUR GODDAMN TRAP.

Bucky Barnes was taken prisoner, mutilated, brainwashed, brain damaged, frozen and thawed in a vicious circle that did god only knows what damage, lied to, tortured, depersonalized and basically violated in all the ways a person can be violated.

Bucky Barnes is a victim.

Grant Ward did nothing he didn’t want to do. No one forced him to do anything.

Even Garrett did what? Pluck him out of jail, plop him in the woods, told him to survive and fucked off to occasionally reappear once every few months. Ward could have used that time to take his shit and do some fucking off of his own to do whatever he wished, but he didn’t.

He didn’t because for all his macho persona Grant Ward is actually weak and needed someone to tell him what to do and what to be.

Bucky was made into a tool by and for his torturers, Ward willingly made himself Garrett’s dog.

Bucky was made to do horrible things with no choice in the matter. Ward did horrible things because he was told to and he doesn’t care what those orders are, he does what he’s told.

Bucky only needed to see Steve for his mental conditioning to start breaking and to ultimately take his first steps into reclaiming himself, Ward went to pieces when there weren’t any orders to follow because he’s nothing without someone holding his leash and telling him what to do. He begged to be given a mission.

Bucky is a good man who was horribly victimized, Ward is an amoral psycho.

To even imagine comparing those two characters is an insult to anyone who watched CA: TWS and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and frankly anyone with a half-functioning brain.

(via alkja)

16 hours ago with 875 notes — via itskindofhot-actually, © jennieconvertible



[38-39/100] → scarlett johansson

22 hours ago with 1292 notes — via scienceboyfriends, © momopuff



burdenedwithgloriousassbutt:

jackiefarrell:

Kat Dennings’ curves appreciation post

in which we are all Tom

22 hours ago with 301825 notes — via urulokid, © kat-dennings



dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

1 day ago with 138292 notes — via odins-one-eyed-fuck, © wine-loving-vagabond



50shadesofsuperwholock:

swashbucklingsherlock:

A while ago whilst watching supernatural, I began to wonder about the burning-on-the-ceiling deaths and why on earth their stomachs bled, which then led to to the possible horrifying conclusion that the women targeted may have been pregnant at the time.

John and Mary had a baby but you never know, they could have accidentally made another

The woman who narrowly escaped this fate was part of a new family with a new baby and again there’s the possibility.

Finally there’s Jess, her and Sam would have had a sexual relationship and again there could have been a small moose growing in her tummy.

Obviously if this even a possibility the pregnancy would be just starting and unknown to the mother and father, but it would explain the whole bloody stomach thing

Or this may just be me putting more pain into an already painful situation

image

1 day ago with 13549 notes — via homocrab, © swashbucklingsherlock



mr-horseface-kirstein:

I SHOWED THIS TO MY FRIEND WHO’S STRAIGHT AND SHE HAD AN EXISTENTIAL CRISIS BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T FIGURE OUT NUMBER 5 AND SHE WAS REALLY CONFUSED

mr-horseface-kirstein:

I SHOWED THIS TO MY FRIEND WHO’S STRAIGHT AND SHE HAD AN EXISTENTIAL CRISIS BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T FIGURE OUT NUMBER 5 AND SHE WAS REALLY CONFUSED

1 day ago with 41115 notes — via homocrab, © psychologicalfact
#what the fuck #does 5 even have a number in it???? #i cant fucking find it



jeskaeli:

science-sexual:

breelandwalker:

*HIC-BLORP*

This is a fucking seal with hiccups which makes is like fifteen times funnier because they’re such ridiculous predators.

HAHA omg i’m cackling

jeskaeli:

science-sexual:

breelandwalker:

*HIC-BLORP*

This is a fucking seal with hiccups which makes is like fifteen times funnier because they’re such ridiculous predators.

HAHA omg i’m cackling

1 day ago with 242293 notes — via brbshittoavenge, © jake--from--statefarm



crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

1 day ago with 209091 notes — via itskindofhot-actually, © crusherccme



lostincape-town:

laragazzachescrivevainsegreto:

I will always reblog this

1 day ago with 233234 notes — via hopefulmachine, © lilyinadream



alykat86:

mikes-grrl:

So I’ve been sitting on this gifset for a while, trying to think of how I want to parse this.

Maybe I’m following the wrong blogs, but I just do not see enough meta about Natasha’s story arc in this movie. This scene here is, to me, one of the three critical moments for Natasha that are the reasons she ends up being the one to release all of SHIELD’s data to the world.

As follows (quotes paraphrased as I don’t have the script):

  1. The first critical moment comes on the Lemurian Star, right after Batroc throws a grenade at her and Steve. They end up sitting on the floor and she says, “Okay, that one’s on me” and Steve replies “Damn right it is.” Her reaction to that isn’t disdain or frustration with Steve, it’s very clearly a form of disappointment — she’s upset with how Steve views her, his opinion of her. Sure, I’m reading a lot into that expression, but I think it is pretty masterful of ScarJo to show that side of Natasha in such an ambiguous way. The take-away here, however you want to describe it, is that Natasha’s unhappiness has less to do with being nearly blown up than with her working relationship with Steve. He doesn’t trust her, and that burns her.
  2. The above gif’d scene, where it’s clear that she’s pretty shocked and upset to hear Steve admit that previous to their current situation, he would NOT have trusted her. It’s a blow for her to realize just how she’s been perceived by those she’s given her complete trust and faith to. 
  3. The scene where Fury’s survival is revealed is the final one, where Natasha reacts as if to a body blow when she realizes that Fury didn’t trust her, but he did trust Maria Hill. Earlier when he was “dying” it was clear that she’s somehow emotionally attached to Fury, and whatever reason you want to concoct for that, the fact is that she clearly believed that he did trust her…but he didn’t. My opinion of her reaction shot at the reveal is that she’s not angry about it, she’s heartbroken.

What I believe this all points to is really well reflected in her line to Steve, “I don’t know everything, I just act like I do” (paraphrased), and then reiterated in the truck ride where she talks about being the person she needs to be, as opposed to who she is. 

In other words, Natasha is so good at being “whatever you need me to be” that it is exactly what the people who know her best expect of her, and accordingly don’t feel like she’s trustworthy because they don’t know the “real” her. Meanwhile she has been operating on the belief that they do know the real her and so therefore do trust her. 

It’s like…a double blind situation, where both parties aren’t privy to the truth, even though they think they are. Everyone up to and including Fury “knows” that Natasha is a spy and nothing she says can be trusted; Natasha “knows” that the people she trusts see through that mask and trust her in return because they know the real her. She goes around in this movie constantly surprised and disarmed by the fact that her closest friends/co-workers doubt her loyalty. 

So in the end, when Pierce is asking if she is ready for her past to be revealed, she is so fucking ready it hurts. She knows it is the right thing to do, but putting that on top of the experiences given above, it’s easy to see that she felt she had to do it for herself too. 

Can she be trusted? You’re damn right she can, and she was willing to burn down her entire world to prove that fact to the very people she thought knew it already.

*Stands up and slow claps for this!* Alllllllll this.

1 day ago with 9364 notes — via littlerussianspider, © forassgard



food-is-glorious:

advicefromadad:

Stop The Beauty Madness is a series of 25 advertisements branded with honest messages that highlight the true “madness” involved in creating and meeting beauty standards. Rice, an author and the founder of Be Who You Are Productions, started the campaign to challenge an internalized belief that a woman’s beauty determines her value.

Have a good look here- X

these are beautiful

2 days ago with 40603 notes — via whydotheykeeptakingmine, © advicefromadad



morgan-leigh:

tomato-greens:

castielsbottledgrace:

jibblyuniverse:

Every time Steve Rogers has sex, a bald eagle is born

No wonder they’re endangered.

Just putting out there that bald eagles are no longer endangered! And are actually multiplying at a, well, fairly impressive rate - they are now categorized as “least concern.”

NICE GOIN’, STEVE.

what an important post.

2 days ago with 117057 notes — via whydotheykeeptakingmine, © jibblyuniverse



2 days ago with 62133 notes — via agentromanoff, © pursuable